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Case Studies


Vermicast Application: Pasture
2 October 2014
Vermicast Application: Pasture

MyNOKE organic vermicast increases pasture soil fertility by promoting a healthy, well developed soil profile. Thanks to the moisture holding and nutrient exchange capacity of the vermicast, we see the development of a greater plant root system which diminishes nutrient leakage and runoff. Vermicast also promotes microbial diversity which reduces the incidence of pasture problems such as grass grub and facial eczema.

MyNOKE organic vermicast acts as an excellent soil conditioner for pasture, mitigating nutrient loss and leakage as well as increasing the soils moisture and nutrient holding capacity. MyNOKE vermicompost adds important organic matter to a pasture, complete with a wide array of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, protozoa and of course, earthworms.

Nutrient leakage is a serious problem in pasture soils. Recently converted pastures tend to have a lower moisture holding capacity, nutrient exchange capacity and lowered biodiversity. Not only does MyNOKE vermicompost supply mature organic humus with its own moisture holding and nutrient exchange capacity, but also steadily inoculates pasture with earthworms and worm capsules which greatly improves the soil profile over time. This helps mitigate the loss of nutrients, lowering leachate as soils develop. Vermicast also triggers the development of pasture by secreting humic-like acids (auxins and gibberellins) which stimulate the production of root systems. Deeper root system reduce leachate by retaining more water and nutrients, for longer.

Adding MyNOKE organic compost to pasture also reduces the incidence of disease-related problems such as grass grub and facial eczema. By adding humus and earthworms to the first few centimetres of soil speeds up the turnover of decaying organic matter such as dead grass, which is a problematic source of unwanted fungi, such as the fungi responsible for facial eczema. Biodiversity also plays a key role in controlling grass grub populations, with a more diverse system lowering the incidence of this pest species. A healthy soil promotes a strong and diverse pasture.